Dollar downtrend confirmed; business cycle ending?

The end of the dollar rally is a topic that I’ve discussed previously. Now that the period of congestion (or sideways trading within a range) is over, the short and intermediate term trends seem to be re-aligning with the longer term downtrend in the exchange traded value of the US currency.

While this downward move is likely only in its early stages, it’s important to remember why the dollar rally happened in the first place: A Fed rate fake out.

dollar_chart

Time and time again from 2014 and on the Fed said it would raise rates. Talk of tightening even prompted taper tantrums and rate hike jitters leading to large, volatile market moves.

Now that the Fed has walked back on its promise of 4 rate hikes in 2016, and may not even hike again this year, reflation is beginning to show itself in various commodity prices. And this is a good thing.

The weakening of the dollar is the natural response to a situation where the international interest rate differential is being neutralized by a nervous central back here at home. What had caused the rally is now being discounted. And the rally started at a much lower exchange traded rate — so chances are that this downturn in the dollar has much farther down to go.

Translation? Higher commodity prices, resource stocks will continue their rally and the international players that benefit from a weaker dollar (like exporters) will benefit. Prices for food and energy will rise. Services will follow.

This is the natural final inning of a business cycle approaching. There’s nothing wrong with it provided that an exit plan is mapped out.