It’s not just Amazon gutting retail

There’s so much talk of Amazon bringing doom to all things retail that I think it’s fair to take a step back and look at the bigger picture. A massive downsizing of US retail was inevitable. We have 600%+ more retail space in shops, malls and megastores than any other first world country. That’s a big tell.

Adding to that, as Americans we tend to overspend, beyond our means, and use debt to drive that consumption forward. That is to say, we can’t collectively always afford what we’re buying, so we tend borrow to buy. That cycle of debt-driven overconsumption did not end well in 2007-2008. Since then we’ve seen mid-tier and low-tier discretionary spending trends at many retail stores flat to down as consumers try to deleverage.

It’s also becoming more obvious that online shopping is driving sales away from brick and mortar companies who haven’t had the wherewithal to create a cohesive online shopping experience — or who have failed to effectively solidify customer loyalty. Further, as companies like Amazon grow and offer a sort of “Walmart of the Internet” approach to allow someone to do most of their shopping on a single website, ill prepared stores will suffer, losing more sales and customers.

But I feel that there are much bigger catalysts at work here as well. We’re confronting a generational shift from tangible consumerism to intangible consumerism. Retail stores have trouble selling intangibles. An example of that would be GameStop, who should be flourishing in the age of electronic sports and online gaming, but is instead collapsing in on itself due to its inability to execute online. Meanwhile, companies like Activision Blizzard, Valve, EA Games and others have created extremely lucrative online game distribution platforms, tying together the purchasing, social and gaming experience.

The same is true of application spending. Surely no customer is going to trek out to a store to download an application on to their phone, tablet or computer. That used to be the case, however, as software was too bulky to download and vendors were cautious to distribute online for fear of piracy. But much has changed since the early days of software distribution.

How we buy, what we buy and whom we buy it from are all changing. This appears to be a generational shift perhaps almost as much as it is a correction in retail overabundance to more normalized levels.

Full disclosure: Short the NASDAQ 100.