Correction brings opportunities in resource sector

The resource sector is getting slammed today on account of a marginally higher dollar, and one dissenting Fed member (Bullard) jawboning an April rate hike (conceivably to test the market’s reaction).

In all likelihood, given that the Fed has all but lost its credibility and certainly doesn’t want to be credited with causing deflation, a rate hike will not happen in April.  In fact, if anything I expect more dovish language on account of a deteriorating domestic housing market, more global economic uncertainty and the fact that we are right in the midst of election season (and the Fed seems to have more of a democratic bias — perhaps because many republicans are openly hostile toward the Fed).

My thought is that Bullard’s bluff will be called. That means the lower prices I am seeing now across the resource sector could be a wonderful opportunity to allocate capital at a discount.

Stay nimble.

Negative interest rates, positive investment returns?

I wrote in January that it was time to look at the resource sector. Since then energy, materials and precious metals producers have provided double digit returns. And this is likely only the beginning.

Negative rates are the new normal.

Major changes are occurring in the global picture. Changes that may appear to be disorienting.  Such as today’s ECB rate cut and QE extension causing a massive near 2% rally in the Euro, defying all expectations.

Or the Bank of Japan’s negative interest rate program boosting the Yen.

This may be a sign of something much more critical to resource sector stocks: a beginning of the end for the US dollar rally.

I wrote last year that the US dollar rally was stalling. Since then the dollar has stalled, moving up and down, but having a very hard time making a decisive continuation of its short term uptrend — or its long term downtrend.  Instead it has been consolidating with a more downward bias as of late.

This to me is suggestive that the US dollar rally is in a phase where the next trend is being decided by the conviction of buyers and sellers and the global economic picture as it changes.  And it is changing — rapidly.

There is no doubt that the US economy has made some progress since the depths of the crisis in 2008-2009, but it is not the level of progress that the stock market would suggest or that the unemployment rate seems to portend.

Instead we’ve enjoyed a very slow, very weak recovery that has mostly created part time, low paying jobs. And this is not as much of a political issue as it is a monetary policy issue.

QE, low interest rates and bail outs have transferred wealth from the working class, and shrinking middle class to the wealthy.

This actually hurts the economy. Slowing consumption, reducing confidence and shrinking the job market. Reality is setting in. Federal Reserve policy makers seem to be realizing that their hawkish hopes of hiking interest rates may be just that. We may even see negative interest rates before we see a 1% Federal Reserve interest rate again.

Such a development is very positive for those traditional inflation hedges.  Which is why I will continue to circle various components of the resource sector in pursuit of misunderstood or undervalued companies which could be valuable investments for the long term.

China halts, dollar faults, buyers bolt

Storms are brewing. The wind will carry them from the east to the west. Be careful out there.

Thursday will be another difficult day in stocks and risky credit markets. The dollar is no longer being seen as much of a safe haven. Gold is catching a bid, but for how long?

Psych! No hike.

With all the prognostication of an interest rate increase happening from Fed watchers and certain economists, I feel a sense of Deja Vu for previously expected rate hikes in this business cycle.  There was no hike, no easing — just more of the same.  What does it all mean?

It’s the economy, stupid.

We’re not recovering. The Fed can see that in its magic crystal ball of financial and economic data. There are even hints of deflation in consumer prices.  Oh no, perish the thought of things getting cheaper when people have less to spend!

What about December?

Hiking near Christmas would make the Fed the Grinch Who Stole Christmas!  It won’t happen.  The next chance is going to be in 2016.

How did markets react?

The Dow briefly turned negative, the S&P shrugged off some of its modest gains and the US dollar dropped.  Some commodities are gaining — as they should — because the dollar’s strength was pushing them down.  And that strength was built on the rumor of a rate hike.

Where do we go from here?

Expect more jawboning about rate hikes, but a hesitant trigger finger.  I don’t think global markets, let alone our own, can withstand higher interest rates.  Ultimately, however, the Fed is losing credibility here — and fast.

Gold continues tumble without outside catalyst

Producer prices were flat as was the US dollar index, but that didn’t stop a determined seller from pushing gold prices down this morning.

What is driving the selling pressure?

Most traders are paid to execute orders to maximize value.  That is to say, if you are selling a commodity you want to sell it for the highest price (or short it at the highest price) to maximize your profits.

What we’ve seen within the last several years is the opposite of that.  Regular dumping of gold (and silver) futures contracts with heavy volume at the lowest prices.  Huge lots executed at once — rather than distributed over the course of a day to achieve a volume average weighted price.

Are prices being fixed?

This leads the gold investing community to believe that there is malicious manipulation underway in these markets.  And with just about every other market in the world having been proven to be manipulated, such as LIBOR, foreign exchange, bonds, equities and other commodities — perhaps, just perhaps it’s not too paranoid of a theory after all.

A reason to sell so many contracts in to the market at once would be to push price down through sell stop orders.  

This action forces prices even lower and pushes many out of long positions.

Only the people pushing the sell button truly know their own intentions (or that of the institution they are employed by).  An outside observer of these markets is forced to draw their own conclusions.

How can so many claim to own the same gold?

The ratio of futures contracts to ounces of physical gold at the COMEX has risen to the highest levels on record.  Last checked, it was closing in on 250 gold futures claims per ounce of physical gold actually available.  This means that should there be a large demand for COMEX gold delivery, there may not be the gold available to fulfill the order — necessitating a cash settlement.

If one was seeking delivery to obtain physical metal for storage, this would force that party to seek gold elsewhere as soon as possible with that settled cash.  And given that so many parties seem to have claims on the same ounces of gold, that could prove to be an interesting setup for a phenomenal short squeeze that drives prices much, much higher.

Potential scenarios for the continued decline.

How this particular situation resolves remains a mystery, but I am inclined to speculate that we have two possible scenarios that could play out:

1: We are witnessing the beginning of the one of the greatest deflationary collapses the world has ever seen, as evidenced by commodity prices imploding, China’s economy in serious decline and recent volatility in equity markets.  If this is the case then it will be difficult to find a safe home for one’s money almost anywhere.

2: The precious metals markets’ prices are being guided lower in order to reduce the bid for what were once considered safe haven assets by many.  Eventually, if such a scheme is underway, it will unravel with prices going much higher.

Which of these scenarios is playing out remains to be realized.  

The former means the global markets are coming unglued at the seams and the global economy is crushed.  The latter would indicate that certain parties are concerned that a higher gold price could reduce confidence in other markets such as stocks and bonds.

Has gold finally bottomed?

Let me start by saying I think it’s hard for anyone to call a bottom.  Many experts do, and often they do so with the guidance of charts, fundamental analysis and other informed speculation.  I am no expert, but I do think we’re finally seeing a turn in the precious metals markets based on two critical factors.

The US dollar and gold have rallied together as of late.  This doesn’t often happen, especially at multi-year highs in the dollar.  But it has for the past couple of days.  And during very large US dollar rallies.  As you can see in the chart below, for the past six months when the US dollar rallied, gold and silver were sold.

US dollar chart

This is a convincing indication that the precious metals markets are looking beyond the myopic view of the US dollar index (which really only measures the Euro and Yen weakness/strength vs. the US dollar) and seeing that rising risks demand a safe haven.  It may also indicate that the US dollar rally is beginning to lose its luster.

We also saw that the tax loss selling last year did not push gold and silver to new lows, or break down the miners further.  This is a very powerful indication that sentiment bottomed out in the October/November bloodbath that was likely a capitulative event.

I am not ready to say that we are turning right now, but I do think that there is a good chance of it.  In essence, if the precious metals markets can look beyond the dollar, or better yet, the dollar can begin to give back its rally from late 2014, we will be in for a year of renewed strength in precious metals, and their miners.

US dollar short vs long

The US dollar trade is as crowded as a trade can get and so many are short Euros and Yen that any unexpected surprises will roil the forex markets.  But gold and silver are telling us that doesn’t matter.  That they can look beyond forex and see that the risks are strong enough to warrant a significant bid (and most likely short covering — we’ll see the COT tomorrow).

Gold chart (daily)

From a technical standpoint I’d like to see gold trade above $1,260.00 on a sustained rally (closing the week on Friday above that level would be critical).  Ideally this price action would occur by the close of the second week of January, 2015.  After that I believe we’ll see some short covering and less aggressive posturing from the sellers counting on another waterfall capitulation in prices.

If gold can make its way back to $1,400 by the end of the first quarter of 2015, then I do believe we’ll see the momentum chasers come back to the table and start driving prices higher through leveraged speculation.  This may also renew the appetite from Asian buyers for physical bullion as the low prices have turned from a positive to a perceived negative as of late.

Silver’s scary sell-off

Silver and silver-related assets were smashed across the board on Friday as the World Bank and IMF met in Washington, DC to discuss the worsening global crisis.  Other commodities saw sharp declines as well.  More silver was traded that day in any given hour than silver is available on the market for an entire year.  It was an electronic sell-off.  Physical prices now command a 10-20% premium to spot paper prices, the highest in years.  Gold to silver ratio is now over 1:50, the highest in a very long time.

Predictably news comes out after the trading day (but we must assume the large insiders knew the whole time) that COMEX was raising margins by 15.6% on silver. 

http://www.gold-prices.biz/comex-raises-gold-margins-by-215-silver-margins-by-156/

The problem is the COMEX does not have the silver to deliver, so forced liquidation is the strongest tool they have to bring prices down and take parties who would seek delivery out of the equation.

Silver is still up 46.31% on the year and has strong support in the $30.00 area.  I think we need to see what the price action is when buyers step in and shorts cover.  It could very well move up as fast as it did down (and higher) if we see ECB rate cuts, a Greek bail out, good earnings in the US, emergency Fed easing or other central bank policy movements as well as any geopolitical or event risk scenarios playing out.

Given that even though silver fell to $30.00, but physical silver commands a price of $33-35.00, there is evidence of a growing paper vs. physical price discovery bifurcation. 

http://www.apmex.com/Category/160/Silver_Eagles___Uncirculated_2011__Prior.aspx

As far as my strategy goes, I don’t see any change in the situation for the dollar long term.  The recent strength has been more of a liquidation panic in Europe and foreigners buying dollars because it’s the least bad currency for the moment.  There’s even some rumor of weaker central banks liquidating gold and silver holdings to raise liquidity.

I saw the same pattern of behavior in 2008 and 2009, yet gold and silver are much, much higher now despite the occasional (and sometimes violent) correction.

Over the last 11 years silver and gold have outperformed all sectors of the S&P 500 by many multiples.  There is no paper asset class quite as trusted during times of crisis, either. 

http://finance.yahoo.com/q/ta?t=my&s=SLV&l=on&z=l&q=l&c=SPY (three year chart)

Now, given the potential for further easing by the Fed, ECB, BOJ, BOE, SNB and others, the need to monetize debt in the US to keep the government open (i.e. the necessity for QE3) — without debt monetization the government will go in to a crisis mode where their ability to spend will be limited as interest rates rise because treasuries are sold more than bought.  But we’re not the only country that has to monetize debt.  Keep in mind the US government has over $75 trillion in unfunded liabilities and there’s no ‘economic growth’ scenario that allows these debts to be funded from revenues.

QE3 from the Fed at this point seems like a foregone conclusion once we see a sovereign debt or large bank collapse.  The ECB is also monetizing debt in the Euro zone for a few of the larger PIIGS, the BOE has QE’d in England and there’s a good chance the BOJ and SNB will continue to print money to artificially devalue their currency.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/09/24/us-imf-ecb-stark-idUSTRE78N1Y220110924

These actions will create a short to intermediate term burst in global money supply — and hot money seeking a high return.  These types of inflationary pressures lead to booms for precious metals.  

http://www.businessweek.com/ap/financialnews/D9PU96280.htm

Greece’s default is all but inevitable, and that is going to rock the world and create the need for much, much more liquidity.  This situation will spread throughout Europe and spread here and to Asia.  Lower rates and more stimulus will follow.

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/lehman-weekend-redux

Many shops sold out of their silver bars and coins on Friday because the appetite for physical silver was so strong at $30.00 (even though customers gladly paid the $5.00+ premium making purchases $35.00+ per ounce).  In fact I still saw online stores selling silver for $45.00 to $50.00 per ounce.

http://kingworldnews.com/kingworldnews/KWN_DailyWeb/Entries/2011/9/23_Sprott_Money_Temporarily_Runs_Out_of_Physical_Silver.html

I believe that the bifurcation in physical and paper prices is important to note because it indicates that there are two markets.  A real market and a phony market.  The phony market is being manipulated downward to an artificially depressed price.

This happened in 2008, too.  But from that low price of $8.00 silver quickly rose to $48.00 in the course of three years, a 600% increase or averaged to 200% per year.

http://www.kitco.com/charts/popup/ag3650nyb.html

Gerald Celente, one of the best trend forecasters of our era is now buying physical silver.  He made the announcement on Friday, so I believe that will mean something to the many that follow his advice and watch his investments closely.

http://kingworldnews.com/kingworldnews/Broadcast/Entries/2011/9/24_Gerald_Celente.html

One year silver chart

Tonight silver is testing the 350 day moving average.  Some continuation selling was to be expected after Friday’s drop, but we’re looking for some consolidation or even a short term reversal due to the very, very oversold condition, combined with the support of the 350 day moving average at 29.57 as well as the appetite that should be present in Asia during this season.

We’re also dealing with price move that is over a four standard deviation event — i.e. something that is extraordinarily rare and it’s punctured the bottom bollinger band, leaving a reversion to the moving average around $37.00-40.00 quite possible if technical buyers come in.

24 hour silver chart Right now silver is trading at $29.83, having found some support at the $29.57 area.

Volume is light as to be expected, but once Sydney and Hong Kong open we’ll get a better idea of what the Asian appetites for metals are after last week’s discount.

Personally, I am tempted to buy silver and silver-related assets given these discounts.  Even if prices are weak short term, I know they will be much, much higher in the intermediate and longer term.